Tate

Tate

Tate

Tate

Tate

Tate

Tate has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way the world sees Britain

The Observer, May 2005

Tate Case Study

Ambition

In the 1990s, the Tate Gallery at Millbank had opened new sites in Liverpool and St. Ives and formed a breathtaking new ambition: to create a huge new modern art gallery at Bankside power station in London. Tate wanted to make all four sites into something new: not traditional institutions, but exciting destinations.

Action

With help from Wolff Olins, Tate reinvented the idea of a gallery from a single, institutional view, to a branded collection of experiences, sharing an attitude by offering many different ways of seeing. The new Tate would become a part of everyday national life, democratizing without dumbing down. Wolff Olins created the Tate brand under the idea "look again, think again": both an invitation and a challenge to visitors. Instead of the confusing "Millbank" and "Bankside," we named the London sites Tate Britain and Tate Modern to signal what kind of art people would find inside. We designed a range of logos that move in and out of focus, suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate - always changing but always recognizable. And we shaped Tate's visual style, influencing its posters, website, publications and shops. Seven years after the initial launch, we helped Tate refresh its vision for the decade ahead.

Impact

From the day it opened, Tate Modern was a huge success, attracting double its target visitor numbers, and becoming the most popular modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate's overall annual visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the Observer wrote in 2005, Tate "has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way the world sees Britain."

In 2012 Tate Modern broke records with 5.3 million annual visitors, a 9% increase, making it the busiest year in it's history.

BBC celebrates Tate Modern turning 10

BBC celebrates Tate Modern turning 10

Wolff Olins’ chairman Brian Boylan and creative director Marina Willer today featured on BBC 2’s Culture Show talking about the ground-breaking Tate brand, created in 2000 by Wolff Olins. The programme, dedicated to Tate Modern's 10th birthday, sought to understand how the institution has become one of the most successful modern art museums in the world. Brian and Marina, along with Sir Nicholas Serota, and artists Tracey Emin, Grayson Perry and Rachel Whiteread explained to art critic Matt Collings how the organisation set about realising its ambition to revolutionise the way people perceive art. To watch the programme go to www.bbc.co.uk/.

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Tate

Tate Shop

Tate Shop

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One of the things Tate Modern has done, beyond anyone's imaginings, is to make the connection with a broader public

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Ten years of Tate Modern

Tate Kids & Families Film

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Tate logo wins accolade

Tate logo wins accolade

The Tate logo has been voted one of the best logos of all time by UK design bible, Creative Review. The logo entered Creative Review’s chart at number six above Apple & the Rolling Stones. The Woolmark logo was the overall winner, with Deutsche Bank and British Rail at two and three respectively.

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Tate

Logo talk

Watching kids TV this week (don't ask) & caught this from Tate http://bit.ly/owpYPi Tate proving, yet again, that art really is for all!

@WolffOlins